Center for Devices and Radiological Health

USFDA clears first test to detect genetic markers for antibiotic-resistant bacteria

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration  cleared for marketing the Xpert Carba-R Assay, an infection control aid that tests patient specimens to detect specific genetic markers associated with bacteria that are resistant to Carbapenem antibiotics. Carbapenem antibiotics are widely used in hospitals to treat severe infections. These resistant organisms are commonly referred to as Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, and have been reported in almost all states within the U.S.

“By using a specimen taken directly from a patient to test for the presence of genetic markers, hospitals can more quickly identify these dangerous bacteria resistant to certain antibiotics,” said Alberto Gutierrez, M.D., director of the FDA’s Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

Current methods to identify colonization with CRE or other resistant organisms rely on growing bacteria from fecal material in cultures, which are then subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing to determine in vitro susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Bacterial culture methods and susceptibility testing may take up to four days, and additional testing is often also required to confirm that carbapenemase, an enzyme that inactivates carbapenem antibiotics, is present. The Xpert Carba-R Assay tests specimens directly taken from patients, which are usually obtained by rectal swabs, for the presence of five different genetic markers that are associated with carbapenemase, the enzyme produced by CRE.

The Xpert Carba-R Assay is intended as an aid in infection control and can be used in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory findings. Although the Xpert Carba-R Assay tests for the most prevalent carbapenemase genes associated with resistance to carbapenem antibiotics, it does not detect the bacteria, carbapenemase activity or other possible non-enzymatic causes of carbapenem resistance. The Xpert Carba-R Assay tests only for genetic material.

The Xpert Carba-R Assay also does not detect all types of carbapenemase genes, and it is important to recover bacteria for accurately tracking the spread of carbapenem resistance. Labs should continue to perform standard bacterial culture in conjunction with the Xpert Carba-R Assay. In addition, concomitant cultures are necessary to recover organisms for epidemiological typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and for confirmatory bacterial identification.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CRE infections most commonly occur in people with exposure to health care settings, like hospitals and long-term care facilities. Because of this, these types of infections often occur among patients who are receiving treatment for other serious conditions. Patients whose care requires devices like ventilators, urinary catheters, or intravenous catheters, and patients who are taking long courses of certain antibiotics are among those at risk for CRE infections.

CRE are usually resistant to many other antibiotics in addition to carbapenems, and several CRE outbreaks of these highly resistant bacteria have been reported in the U.S. When bacteria become resistant to carbapenems, few treatment options may remain. Some CRE bacteria have become resistant to almost all available antibiotics and present a significant public health threat.

The FDA’s decision to provide clearance was based on data from two clinical studies. A prospective study used rectal swabs from 755 patients in hospitals or long-term care facilities to compare results from the Xpert Carba-R Assay with results from reference cultures and automated real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing. A second study designed to test the clinical performance of the Xpert Carba-R Assay used 432 rectal swabs that were artificially prepared with specific concentrations of bacteria containing the genes detected by the test. The results of these studies demonstrated similar performance between the Xpert Carba-R Assay and culture method.
The Xpert Carba-R Assay is manufactured by Cepheid, located in Sunnyvale, Calif.

Source: 1, 2

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FDA allows marketing of first non-invasive test to help in identifying cause of certain kidney disease

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kidney-disease-symptoms

U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed marketing of the first test that can help determine if a specific type of kidney disease, called membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), is due to the body’s rejection of its own kidney tissue (autoimmune) or if it is due to another cause (such an infection).

Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) is a chronic kidney disease that causes damage to the cluster of blood vessels (glomeruli) in the kidney that filter the blood and begin the process to remove waste and excess fluid from the blood. Once the disease progresses, other areas of the kidney become damaged. Symptoms of MGN include swelling, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and increased predisposition to blood clots. Over time, usually 10-20 years, some people with MGN proceed to kidney failure and require a kidney transplant. MGN affects mostly adult, Caucasian men.

Some cases of MGN are associated with secondary conditions such as infections or tumors, adverse reactions to drugs, or poisoning. However, about 85 percent of MGN cases are caused by the body’s immune system mistakenly attacking healthy kidney tissue, a condition called primary MGN (pMGN), which is one of the leading causes of kidney disease in adults.

The EUROIMMUN Anti- PLA2R IFA blood test detects if a patient has an antibody (a protein molecule the body’s immune system produces) that is specific to pMGN.

“Treatment of MGN depends on the underlying cause of the disease,” said Alberto Gutierrez, Ph.D., director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the FDA. “This test can help patients get a timely diagnosis for their MGN and aid with earlier treatment.”

The FDA’s review included a clinical study of 560 blood samples of which 275 samples were obtained from patients with presumed pMGN, while 285 samples were obtained from patients diagnosed with other kidney diseases (including secondary MGN) and autoimmune diseases, not including pMGN, that can damage the kidney, like lupus. The test was able to detect pMGN in 77 percent of the presumed pMGN samples, and gave a false positive result in less than 1 percent of the other disease samples. Notably, the test was helpful in distinguishing between pMGN from sMGN in most of the patients.

The test should not be used alone to diagnose pMGN. Additional information, including patient symptoms and other laboratory tests, should always be considered when making a diagnosis of pMGN. A biopsy of the kidney is needed to confirm the diagnosis of pMGN. A negative result from the test does not rule out a diagnosis of pMGN.

The test should not be used to monitor the stage of disease or the response to treatment.

The FDA reviewed the EUROIMMUN Anti- PLA2R IFA blood test through its de novo classification process, a regulatory pathway for some novel low- to moderate-risk medical devices that are first-of-a-kind.

EUROIMMUN Anti- PLA2R IFA is manufactured by EUROIMMUN US, Inc. in Morris Plains, N.J.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

FDA allows marketing of first prosthetic arm that translates signals from person’s muscles to perform complex tasks

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Prosthetic arm

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today allowed marketing of the DEKA Arm System, the first prosthetic arm that can perform multiple, simultaneous powered movements controlled by electrical signals from electromyogram (EMG) electrodes.

EMG electrodes detect electrical activity caused by the contraction of muscles close to where the prosthesis is attached. The electrodes send the electrical signals to a computer processor in the prosthesis that translates them to a specific movement or movements.
The EMG electrodes in the DEKA Arm System convert electrical signals into up to 10 powered movements, and it is the same shape and weight as an adult arm. In addition to the EMG electrodes, the DEKA Arm System contains a combination of mechanisms including switches, movement sensors, and force sensors that cause the prosthesis to move.
“This innovative prosthesis provides a new option for people with certain kinds of arm amputations,” said Christy Foreman, director of the Office of Device Evaluation at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “The DEKA Arm System may allow some people to perform more complex tasks than they can with current prostheses in a way that more closely resembles the natural motion of the arm.”
The FDA reviewed clinical information relating to the device, including a 4-site Department of Veterans Affairs study in which 36 DEKA Arm System study participants provided data on how the arm performed in common household and self-care tasks. The study found that approximately 90 percent of study participants were able to perform activities with the DEKA Arm System that they were not able to perform with their current prosthesis, such as using keys and locks, preparing food, feeding oneself, using zippers, and brushing and combing hair.

The DEKA Arm System can be configured for people with limb loss occurring at the shoulder joint, mid-upper arm, or mid-lower arm. It cannot be configured for limb loss at the elbow or wrist joint.

Data reviewed by the FDA also included testing of software and electrical and battery systems, mitigations to prevent or stop unintended movements of the arm and hand mechanisms, durability testing (such as ability to withstand exposure to common environmental factors such as dust and light rain), and impact testing.

The FDA reviewed the DEKA Arm System through its de novo classification process, a regulatory pathway for some novel low- to moderate-risk medical devices that are first-of-a-kind.

The DEKA Arm System is manufactured by DEKA Integrated Solutions in Manchester, N.H.

Source: USFDA

FDA approves first human papillomavirus test for primary cervical cancer screening

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hpv-human-papilloma16-model-ictv8

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first FDA-approved HPV DNA test for women 25 and older that can be used alone to help a health care professional assess the need for a woman to undergo additional diagnostic testing for cervical cancer. The test also can provide information about the patient’s risk for developing cervical cancer in the future.

Using a sample of cervical cells, the cobas HPV Test detects DNA from 14 high-risk HPV types. The test specifically identifies HPV 16 and HPV 18, while concurrently detecting 12 other types of high-risk HPVs.

Based on results of the cobas HPV Test, women who test positive for HPV 16 or HPV 18 should have a colposcopy, an exam using a device that illuminates and magnifies the cervix so a physician can directly observe the cervical cells. Women testing positive for one or more of the 12 other high-risk HPV types should have a Pap test to determine the need for a colposcopy. Health care professionals should use the cobas HPV Test results together with other information, such as the patient screening history and risk factors, and current professional guidelines.

“Today’s approval offers women and physicians a new option for cervical cancer screening,” said Alberto Gutierrez, Ph.D., director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Roche Diagnostics conducted a well-designed study that provided the FDA with a reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness when used as a primary screening tool for cervical cancer.”

The FDA first approved the test, called the cobas HPV Test in 2011 for use in conjunction with or as a follow-up to a Pap test (cell cytology), which examines cervical cells for changes that might become cervical cancer.

Today’s approval expands the use of the test to include use as either a co-test or as a primary cervical cancer screening test, however; it does not change current medical practice guidelines for cervical cancer screening. These guidelines are developed, reviewed and modified by groups other than the FDA.

Genital HPVs are a group of more than 40 related viruses and, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are the most common sexually transmitted infections. Approximately 14 “high-risk” HPV types are associated with cervical cancer.

In most cases, a high-risk HPV infection goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. However, about 10 percent of women infected with high-risk HPV develop a persistent infection which may put them at risk of cancer. Virtually all cervical cancers are caused by HPV infections, with just two types, HPV 16 and HPV 18, responsible for approximately 70 percent of cervical cancers.

Data supporting the use of the cobas HPV Test as a primary screening test for cervical cancer included a study of more than 40,000 women 25 years and older undergoing routine cervical exams. Women who had a positive Pap test or whose cervical cells screened positive for HPV, as well as a subset of women whose Pap and HPV tests were both negative, underwent a colposcopy and cervical tissue biopsy. All biopsy results were compared to the Pap and cobas HPV Test results. Data from this study, which included three years of follow-up on women who went to colposcopy, showed that the cobas HPV Test is safe and effective for the new indication for use.

The cobas HPV Test is manufactured by Roche Molecular Systems, Incorporated, Pleasanton, Calif.

Source: USFDA

FDA issues proposals to address risks associated with surgical mesh for transvaginal repair of pelvic organ prolapse

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pelvic organ prolapse

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued two proposed orders to address the health risks associated with surgical mesh used for transvaginal repair of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). If finalized, the orders would reclassify surgical mesh for transvaginal POP from a moderate-risk device (class II) to a high-risk device (class III) and require manufacturers to submit a premarket approval (PMA) application for the agency to evaluate safety and effectiveness.

POP occurs when the internal structures that support the pelvic organs such as the bladder, uterus and bowel, become so weak, stretched, or broken that the organs drop from their normal position and bulge (prolapse) into the vagina. While not a life-threatening condition, women with POP often experience pelvic discomfort, disruption of their sexual, urinary, and defecatory functions, and an overall reduction in their quality of life.

“The FDA has identified clear risks associated with surgical mesh for the transvaginal repair of pelvic organ prolapse and is now proposing to address those risks for more safe and effective products,” said William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H., deputy director of science and chief scientist at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “If these proposals are finalized, we will require manufacturers to provide premarket clinical data to demonstrate a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness for surgical mesh used to treat transvaginal POP repair.”

Surgical mesh is a medical device that is used to provide additional support when repairing weakened or damaged tissue. Many mesh products come in kits that include instruments specifically designed to aid in insertion, placement, fixation, and anchoring of mesh in the body. Instruments provided in kits will be reviewed as part of the regulatory submission for the mesh product. Instruments are also provided separately from the mesh implant, and the FDA is proposing that this urogynecologic surgical instrumentation be reclassified from low-risk devices (class I) to moderate-risk devices (class II).

Beginning in Jan. 2012, the FDA issued orders to manufacturers of urogynecologic surgical mesh devices to conduct postmarket surveillance studies (522 studies) to address specific safety and effectiveness concerns related to surgical mesh used for transvaginal repair of POP.

In Sept. 2011, the FDA’s Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel recommended that surgical mesh for transvaginal POP be reclassified from class II to class III and require PMAs.

In July 2011, the FDA provided an updated safety communication about serious complications associated with transvaginal placement of surgical mesh used to treat POP. At that time, the FDA also released a review of urogynecologic surgical mesh adverse events and peer-reviewed scientific literature that identified serious safety and effectiveness concerns. The FDA previously communicated about serious complications associated with transvaginal placement of surgical mesh to treat POP and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in an Oct. 2008 FDA Public Health Notification.

Surgical mesh indicated for surgical treatments of SUI, abdominal POP repair with mesh, hernia repair, and other non-urogynecologic indications are not part of this proposed order.

Source: USFDA