USFDA

USFDA gives 21 grants for research on RARE DISEASES

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced that it has awarded 21 new clinical trial research grants totaling more than $23 million over the next four years to boost the development of products for patients with rare diseases. These new grants were awarded to principal investigators from academia and industry with research spanning domestic and international clinical sites.

“We are proud of our 30-year track record of fostering and encouraging the development of safe and effective therapies for rare diseases through our clinical trials grant program,” said Gayatri R. Rao, M.D., J.D., director of FDA’s Office of Orphan Product Development, within the Office of Special Medical Programs. “The grants awarded this year will support much-needed research in 21 different rare diseases, many of which have little, or no, available treatment options.”

The FDA awards the grants through the Orphan Products Clinical Trials Grants Program to encourage clinical development of drugs, biologics, medical devices, or medical foods for use in rare diseases. The grants are intended for clinical studies evaluating the safety and effectiveness of products that could either result in, or substantially contribute to, the FDA approval of products.

Since its creation in 1983, the Orphan Products Clinical Trials Grants Program has provided more than $370 million to fund more than 590 new clinical studies and supported the marketing approval of more than 55 products. Five of the studies funded by this grants program supported product approvals in 2015 alone, including much needed treatments for neuroblastoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, hypoparathyroidism, and hypophosphatasia.

Consistent with the tenor set by Vice President Joe Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative to accelerate cancer research, 24 percent of the new grant awards fund studies enrolling patients with cancer; 40 percent of these studies target devastating forms of brain cancer, one of which recruits children with recurrent or progressive malignant brain tumors.

Forty-three percent of this year’s awards fund studies that enroll pediatric patients as young as newborns. Of these, two focus on research in transplantation and related issues.

In addition, one funded project is a medical device trial to develop a fully implantable neuroprosthesis for grasp, reach, and trunk function in individuals with spinal cord injury with the potential to enable these patients to use their hand, arm, and trunk more independently.

A total of 68 grant applications were received for this fiscal year, with a funding rate of 31 percent (21/68). The grant recipients for fiscal year 2016 include:

Drugs/Biologics:

  • Chemigen, LLC (Zionsville, Indiana), Yansheng Du, Phase 1 Study of CC100 for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis — about $243,000 for one year
  • Chemocentryx, Inc. (Mountain View, California), Petrus Bekker, Phase 2 Study of CCX168 for the Treatment of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Auto-Antibodies Associated Vasculitis — $500,000 for one year
  • Columbia University Health Sciences (New York, New York), Elizabeth Shane, Phase 2B Study of Denosumab to Prevent Bone Loss in Idiopathic Osteoporosis in Premenopausal Women Treated with Terripatide — about $1.6 million over four years
  • DNATRIX, Inc. (Houston, Texas), Frank Tufaro, Phase 2 Study of DNX-2401 for the Treatment of Glioblastoma — $2 million over four years
  • Elorac, Inc. (Vernon Hills, Illinois), Scott Phillips, Phase 3 Study of Naloxone Lotion for the Treatment of Pruritus in Mycosis Fungoides — about $2 million over four years
  • Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, Maryland), Pamela Zeitlin, Phase 1/2 Study of Glycerol Phenylbutyrate for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis — $750,000 over three years
  • Oncoceutics, Inc. (Hummelstown, Pennsylvania), Wolfgang Oster, Phase 1/2 Study of ONC201 for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma — about $1.7 million over four years
  • Oregon Health and Science University (Portland, Oregon), Kevin Winthrop, Phase 2 Study of Clofazimine for the Treatment of Pulmonary Mycobacterium Avium Disease — about $1.8 million over four years
  • Santhera Pharmaceuticals (Liestal, Switzerland), Thomas Meier, Phase 1 Study of Omigapil for the Treatment of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy — $246,000 for one year
  • Scioderm, Inc. (Durham, North Carolina), Jay Barth, Phase 3 Study of SD101 for the Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa — $500,000 for one year
  • Seattle Children’s Research Institute (Seattle, Washington), Leslie Kean, Phase 2 Study of Abatacept Combined with Calcineurin Inhibition and Methotrexate for Prophylaxis of Graft Vs Host Disease — $99,630 for one year
  • Sloan-Kettering Institute Cancer Research (New York, New York), Katharine Hsu, Phase 1 Study of Humanized 3F8 MoAb and NK cells for the Treatment of Neuroblastoma — about $750,000 over three years
  • Taimed Biologics USA Corp (Irvine, California), Stanley Lewis, Phase 3 Study of Ibalizumab for the Treatment of Patients with Multidrug Resistant HIV — $500,000 for one year
  • University of Alabama (Birmingham, Alabama), Gregory Friedman, Phase 1 Study of HSV G207 & Radiation for the Treatment of Pediatric Brain Tumors — about $750,000 over three years
  • University of California, San Diego (La Jolla, California), Donald Durden, Phase 1 Study of PI-3 Kinase/BRD4 Inhibitor SF1126 for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma — $750,000 over three years
  • University of Florida (Gainesville, Florida), Peter Stacpoole, Phase 3 Study of Dichloroacetate for the Treatment of Pyruvate Dehyrugenase Complex Deficiency — about $2 million over four years
  • University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, Michigan), Kathleen Stringer, Phase 2 Study of Inhaled Activase for the Treatment of Acute Plastic Bronchitis — $2 million over four years
  • University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, North Carolina), Matthew Laughon, Phase 2 Study of Furosemide for the Prevention of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Premature Infants — about $1.4 million over four years
  • Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Nashville, Tennessee), Cyndya Shibao, Phase 2 Study of Atomoxetine for the Treatment of Multiple System Atrophy — about $1.6 million over four years
  • Wilson Wolf Manufacturing Corporation (New Brighton, Minnesota), Sunitha Kakarla, Phase 1 Study of Viralym-A for the Treatment of Adenovirus Disease — about $750,000 over three years

Medical Devices:

  • Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio), Kevin Kilgore, Phase 2 Study of a Networked Neuroprosthesis for Grasp, Reach, and Trunk Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury — about $2 million over four years

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US FDA approves Drug to reduce Heart Problems for Diabetic Patients

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for Jardiance (empagliflozin) to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.

“Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus,” said Jean-Marc Guettier, M.D., C.M., director of the Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Availability of antidiabetes therapies that can help people live longer by reducing the risk of cardiovascular death is an important advance for adults with type 2 diabetes.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, death from cardiovascular disease is 70 percent higher in adults with diabetes compared to those without diabetes, and patients with diabetes have a decreased life expectancy driven in large part by premature cardiovascular death.

The FDA’s decision is based on a postmarketing study required by the agency when it approved Jardiance in 2014 as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Jardiance was studied in a postmarket clinical trial of more than 7,000 patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In the trial, Jardiance was shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death compared to a placebo when added to standard of care therapies for diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

Jardiance can cause dehydration and low blood pressure (hypotension). Jardiance can also cause increased ketones in the blood (ketoacidosis), serious urinary tract infection, acute kidney injury and impairment in renal function, low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) when used with insulin or insulin secretagogues (e.g. sulfonylurea, a medication used to treat type 2 diabetes by increasing the release of insulin in the pancreas), vaginal yeast infections and yeast infections of the penis (genital mycotic infections), and increased cholesterol.

The most common side effects of Jardiance are urinary tract infections and female genital infections.

Jardiance is not intended for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Jardiance is contraindicated in patients with a history of serious hypersensitivity reactions to Jardiance, severe renal impairment, end-stage renal disease, or dialysis.

Jardiance is distributed by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield, Connecticut.

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USFDA approves Eucrisa for eczema

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Eucrisa (crisaborole) ointment to treat mild to moderate eczema (atopic dermatitis) in patients two years of age and older.

Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease, is often referred to as “eczema,” which is a general term for the several types of inflammation of the skin. Atopic dermatitis is the most common of the many types of eczema and onset typically begins in childhood and can last through adulthood. The cause of atopic dermatitis is a combination of genetic, immune and environmental factors. In atopic dermatitis, the skin develops red, scaly and crusted bumps, which are extremely itchy. Scratching leads to swelling, cracking, “weeping” clear fluid, and finally, coarsening and thickening of the skin.

“Today’s approval provides another treatment option for patients dealing with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis,” said Amy Egan, deputy director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER).

Eucrisa, applied topically twice daily, is a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE-4) inhibitor, although its specific mechanism of action in atopic dermatitis is not known.

The safety and efficacy of Eucrisa were established in two placebo-controlled trials with a total of 1,522 participants ranging in age from two years of age to 79 years of age, with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis. Overall, participants receiving Eucrisa achieved greater response with clear or almost clear skin after 28 days of treatment.

Serious side effects of Eucrisa include hypersensitivity reactions. Eucrisa should not be used in patients who have had a hypersensitivity reaction to Eucrisa’s active ingredient, crisaborole. The most common side effect of Eucrisa is application site pain, including burning or stinging.

Eucrisa is manufactured by Palo Alto, California-based Anacor Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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USFDA permits marketing of new tissue expander for women undergoing breast reconstruction following mastectomy

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of a new tissue expander system for soft tissue expansion in two-stage breast reconstruction following mastectomy and in the treatment of underdeveloped breasts and soft tissue deformities. A patient uses a dose controller to independently inflate the expander.

A tissue expander is a balloon-like device that has a soft, expandable polymer shell and is gradually filled with saline or air. Tissue expanders are typically used prior to breast reconstruction to cause breast tissue and muscle to stretch over time, which creates a space (called a “pocket”) for the breast implant.

The AeroForm device is a wireless tissue expander for patients who choose to have reconstructive surgery following a mastectomy. Most women who have mastectomies to treat or prevent breast cancer are eligible for breast reconstruction.

“This tissue expander may result in fewer office visits for patients by allowing a patient to partially control their breast tissue expansion,” said Binita Ashar, M.D., director of the Division of Surgical Devices at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Patients need to speak with their surgeons about what type of tissue expander is appropriate for them and the benefits and risks of using an expander following their mastectomy.”

The AeroForm tissue expander system has two main components: a sterile implant with an outer shell made of silicone (called the “expander”) and a remote dosage controller (called the “controller”). The expander contains a reservoir of compressed carbon dioxide. The controller is a hand-held device that communicates with the receiving antenna and electronics located in the expander. The controller is used to communicate to a valve in the reservoir to release carbon dioxide and gradually inflate the expander. The controller is pre-programed to limit releasing a small amount of carbon dioxide once every three hours, up to a maximum of three times per day.

The AeroForm tissue expander differs from available saline-filled tissue expanders. Saline expanders are expanded by the surgeon and use a needle to pierce the skin and inject saline into the expander through a port or injection area. The AeroForm tissue expander is filled with air; there is no need for a needle and the patient has some control over slowly expanding the device at home.

The FDA reviewed results from a clinical trial of 99 patients using the AeroForm expander and 52 patients using the saline expander. The results showed that 96.1 percent of patients using AeroForm expanders and 98.8 percent of patients using saline expanders were able to have their breast tissue successfully expanded and exchanged to a breast implant.

A surgeon must determine whether the patient is a suitable candidate for treatment with the device. Patients must not have any residual tumor at the expansion site and must not undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while the device is in place. Patients with another electronic implant (e.g. pacemaker, defibrillator, or neurostimulator device) are not eligible for treatment with the AeroForm tissue expander.

The most common adverse events seen in the study were necrosis, seroma, post-operative wound infection and procedural pain. Patients using the AeroForm device in the clinical trials did not report any serious adverse events.

The FDA reviewed the data for the AeroForm system through the de novo premarket review pathway, a regulatory pathway for some low- to moderate-risk devices that are novel and for which there is no legally marketed predicate device to which to claim substantial equivalence.

AeroForm is manufactured by AirXpanders of Palo Alto, California.

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USFDA reviews Pfizer’s drug for Metastatic Breast Cancer

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Pfizer has announced that the FDA accepted for review a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for its first-in-class CDK 4/6 inhibitor, IBRANCE (palbociclib). The sNDA supports the conversion of the accelerated approval of IBRANCE in combination with letrozole to regular approval and includes data from the phase III PALOMA-2 trial, which evaluated IBRANCE as initial therapy in combination with letrozole for postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (ER+, HER2-) metastatic breast cancer. This is the same patient population as the randomized phase II PALOMA-1 trial upon which the accelerated approval of IBRANCE plus letrozole was granted in February 2015.

The sNDA was granted Priority Review status, which accelerates FDA review time from 10 months to a goal of six months from the day of acceptance of filing.1 The Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) goal date for a decision by the FDA is in April 2017.

“Since its introduction in 2015, more than 45,000 patients have been prescribed IBRANCE by more than 9,000 providers in the U.S.,” said Liz Barrett, global president and general manager, Pfizer Oncology. “We are pleased that the PALOMA-2 trial has further demonstrated the significant clinical benefit of IBRANCE in the first-line setting, providing additional evidence for its continued use as a standard of care medicine.”

PALOMA-2 is a randomized (2:1), multicenter, double-blind phase III study that evaluated a total of 666 women from 186 global sites in 17 countries. The study demonstrated that IBRANCE in combination with letrozole improved progression-free survival compared to letrozole plus placebo as a first-line treatment for postmenopausal women with ER+, HER2- metastatic breast cancer. The adverse events observed with IBRANCE in combination with letrozole in PALOMA-2 were generally consistent with their respective known adverse event profiles

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